25th Anniversary: ‘Live Through This’ album review

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The rumors about Courtney Love were true: her band’s second album is brilliant. From the deceptively underplayed riffs of opening song “Violet” to its explosive chorus with Love’s rebel yell backed by her four-piece band, Hole laid the groundwork for an album that flexed considerable muscle for the then-peak alternative rock movement. It will stand as one of the genre’s seminal works.

The elephant in the room is neither ignored, pointedly demolished, or obsessed over on this album: can a woman rock legitimately, without negating her femininity?

Love wins, because she has it both ways: she’s so good her gender’s not even relevant, which makes the revelation all the more relevant. She’s a natural: charismatic, dangerous, cocky, defiant, funny, tender, and poetic. That she happens to wear baby doll dresses is moot.

And the answer is a resounding yes: feminine themes are laced throughout the album’s lyrics and sound, but not at the expense of the genre’s nihilism. Just as Love’s voice can command and dominate with raspy force, it can flirt and dance with a showgirl’s glee.

‘I am the girl you know can look you in the eye,’ Love boasts in the raucous first single, “Miss World”. Mixing her favorite concepts of glamour and destruction, the song nakedly implores ‘Watch me break/And watch me burn’, before crunching everything under a guttural chorus: ‘I made my bed and I lie in it’.

Most of the album employs this soft/hard dynamic that dominates the genre, with a few heavy exceptions. “Plump” churns hard guitar riffs like gunfire while Love subverts feminine expectations: ‘I don’t do the dishes/I throw them in the crib.’ “Jennifer’s Body” skitters edgily along until exploding into power pop/rock riffs rivaling any hard-rock contemporaries.

Elsewhere, the slow-burn cautionary tale “Doll Parts” lays down its lyrical and stylistic groundwork so expertly without a hint of artiness: an artist’s dream in the form of twentieth century grunge rock. ‘Someday you will ache like I ache,’ Love forewarns in the chorus, changing the inflection slightly at every reprise until it bears multiple meanings.

A lone guitar riff periodically accents the throbbing bass showcase of the album’s quietest song, “Softer. Softest”, titillating you just as you’re being soothed by the song’s languid spell. It’s these simple but unexpected sonic twists that captivate and challenge listeners.

Throughout the album, we’re reminded again of the ineffable power of music—what can be achieved by the arrangement of chords and beats from a few instruments in different variations. No matter how crude and humble the parts are the sum can be transcendent.

The album’s lyrics alone are exemplary too—born from the best conversations neo-philosophers dream of and budding screenwriters would sacrifice a rent check for: ‘If you live through this with me/I swear that I will die for you’, begs the song “Asking for It”.  ‘I fake it so real I am beyond fake,’ Love concedes in “Doll Parts”. ‘I don’t really miss God/But I sure miss Santa Clause,’ quips “Gutless”. None of the lines feel precious or pretentious, furthering their impact.

Like the lead singer herself though, it’s not an easy album to accept at face value. Its compelling sheen is on alternative-rock terms; this is not your grandmother’s female rock star. Many music fans will simply not bear the palette to welcome it, and it’s their loss.

For fans of alternative rock and true music connoisseurs, however, it is undeniable. “Live Through This” is a stroke of genius in its sonic dynamics, thematic scope, and lyrical potency. It’s rife with excoriating ruminations set to indelible hooks that seduce and assault you simultaneously, daring you to embrace and question yourself and the world—like the best rock music does.

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‘Mind’ Games Keep You Guessing

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The Year I Lost My Mind certainly avoids current gay indie-film tropes, if not most cinematic tropes altogether, with its bizarre collection of idiosyncrasies.

On the surface, it’s a thriller about a troubled young man who dabbles in petty illegal activities, but its his particular tics and habits that amount to a tantalizing viewing experience, if for no other reason than to find out just what the hell is going on?

Tom is a pale, offbeat, lonely gay man in his early 20s, living at home with his mother and sister in Berlin. Our first introduction to him sets the tone: he dons a large horse mask, compelling his resigned mother to ask “Why do you enjoy having people be afraid of you?”

Her inquiry is apt. Things only get stranger from there as her moon-faced, taciturn son walks into stranger scenarios, often wearing a variety of more masks from his bountiful collection.

Tom soon breaks into a stranger’s apartment where the handsome tenant sleeps peacefully, unaware of the passive crime that hovers over him. Tom simply observes the unsuspecting young man, then leaves—making mental notes for some later transgression perhaps.

This leads to a low-grade stalking scenario, spread out over the course of the strange protagonist’s idle days, spying on his subject’s routine around town from a distance.

Through his increasingly disturbing habits, interests, and behavior, one gets the sense that Tom has not only been marginalized by mainstream society but by the gay subculture too, with his unconventional looks that preclude reciprocation when he’s witnessed making advances on other men.

Is this why he is acting out, morally and legally? And to what extent will it manifest?

A subplot unfolds, where Tom encounters a fellow masked man—larger, stranger, and more foreboding them him, at one of his haunts around town: the nearby woods where men cruise each other.

This stirs another question: is his doppelganger’s existence real or merely a figment of Tom’s demented imagination?

Tom revisits his previous subject’s apartment regularly, affirming his lascivious motives in the absent man’s empty bed. He skirts the calamity of being caught more than once, escaping through the glass doors of the patio. His subject begins to notice missing cookies, misplaced books—but he also has a cat, so the picture is hazy.

The inevitable occurs one night when Tom boldly admires the handsome man sleeping in the middle of the night, but he manages to retreat through the front door, buffered by the shock he’s cast over his newly lucid victim.

It’s through another chance that the victim puts two and two together, and he resolves the situation through his own hands—with unexpected results that are intentionally shocking by the filmmaker. Although compelling, it doesn’t feel quite believable enough to be effective.

With a fairly adroit buildup to this climax, it feels a bit of a cheat to only tumble into improbability. The subplot involving Tom’s frightening double is resolved in a more subdued manner, alleviating some of the discord. Nonetheless, the film is effective enough for everything that occurred before its finale—an interesting study in anomaly: its images, moods, and actions are sure to linger long after the screen fades to black.