25th Anniversary: ‘Live Through This’ album review

livethroughthis

The rumors about Courtney Love were true: her band’s second album is brilliant. From the deceptively underplayed riffs of opening song “Violet” to its explosive chorus with Love’s rebel yell backed by her four-piece band, Hole laid the groundwork for an album that flexed considerable muscle for the then-peak alternative rock movement. It will stand as one of the genre’s seminal works.

The elephant in the room is neither ignored, pointedly demolished, or obsessed over on this album: can a woman rock legitimately, without negating her femininity?

Love wins, because she has it both ways: she’s so good her gender’s not even relevant, which makes the revelation all the more relevant. She’s a natural: charismatic, dangerous, cocky, defiant, funny, tender, and poetic. That she happens to wear baby doll dresses is moot.

And the answer is a resounding yes: feminine themes are laced throughout the album’s lyrics and sound, but not at the expense of the genre’s nihilism. Just as Love’s voice can command and dominate with raspy force, it can flirt and dance with a showgirl’s glee.

‘I am the girl you know can look you in the eye,’ Love boasts in the raucous first single, “Miss World”. Mixing her favorite concepts of glamour and destruction, the song nakedly implores ‘Watch me break/And watch me burn’, before crunching everything under a guttural chorus: ‘I made my bed and I lie in it’.

Most of the album employs this soft/hard dynamic that dominates the genre, with a few heavy exceptions. “Plump” churns hard guitar riffs like gunfire while Love subverts feminine expectations: ‘I don’t do the dishes/I throw them in the crib.’ “Jennifer’s Body” skitters edgily along until exploding into power pop/rock riffs rivaling any hard-rock contemporaries.

Elsewhere, the slow-burn cautionary tale “Doll Parts” lays down its lyrical and stylistic groundwork so expertly without a hint of artiness: an artist’s dream in the form of twentieth century grunge rock. ‘Someday you will ache like I ache,’ Love forewarns in the chorus, changing the inflection slightly at every reprise until it bears multiple meanings.

A lone guitar riff periodically accents the throbbing bass showcase of the album’s quietest song, “Softer. Softest”, titillating you just as you’re being soothed by the song’s languid spell. It’s these simple but unexpected sonic twists that captivate and challenge listeners.

Throughout the album, we’re reminded again of the ineffable power of music—what can be achieved by the arrangement of chords and beats from a few instruments in different variations. No matter how crude and humble the parts are the sum can be transcendent.

The album’s lyrics alone are exemplary too—born from the best conversations neo-philosophers dream of and budding screenwriters would sacrifice a rent check for: ‘If you live through this with me/I swear that I will die for you’, begs the song “Asking for It”.  ‘I fake it so real I am beyond fake,’ Love concedes in “Doll Parts”. ‘I don’t really miss God/But I sure miss Santa Clause,’ quips “Gutless”. None of the lines feel precious or pretentious, furthering their impact.

Like the lead singer herself though, it’s not an easy album to accept at face value. Its compelling sheen is on alternative-rock terms; this is not your grandmother’s female rock star. Many music fans will simply not bear the palette to welcome it, and it’s their loss.

For fans of alternative rock and true music connoisseurs, however, it is undeniable. “Live Through This” is a stroke of genius in its sonic dynamics, thematic scope, and lyrical potency. It’s rife with excoriating ruminations set to indelible hooks that seduce and assault you simultaneously, daring you to embrace and question yourself and the world—like the best rock music does.

Album Review: Radiohead’s ‘Moon Shaped Pool’ is One-of-a-Kind Art Rock

Radiohead

The album cover art for Radiohead’s new album A Moon Shaped Pool is a fitting metaphor for the music within: a corrosive, abstract form that defies definition. It is the venerable band’s most oblique and sonically dense record, from their catalog that has consistently defied musical categorization.

It’s easy to get lost in the theorizing of the mystique and motives of such an artistically lauded band instead of focusing on the work that propelled them into such a position in the first place. Their new album stands on its own as a musical work of art, and an admirable extension to their ambitions and abilities as musicians, writers, and artists that have been in the public domain for a quarter of a century now.

The first response I had to the album was not immediate devotion as a fan, but a caveat: it was not outwardly accessible, even for a band that never aimed for such a feat. For a fan, it threw me.

Listened to on a cursory level, the eleven-song cycle could be condensed to obtuse whispers, hushed strings, and formless melodies—all wind and sail, with no immediate soul or beat to anchor one’s mind to. Or so I thought.

Like some records we’ve doubtless encountered, I had to be in the right headspace to receive it. And like the muse behind art, there is no formula for discovering the beauty behind art. It simply arrives on its own.

When it occurred, I found myself intoxicated with ineffable fascination at the album’s sonic landscape. Guitarist Jonny Greenwood was the prime force behind the songs’ use of haunting choruses and emotive strings, imbuing the album with a strange and indescribable beauty that singled it out from any other albums I’ve ever listened to in the rock genre.

Whether it was merely artifice or thematic ingenuity, I found myself quietly stunned and enraptured, like a zealot hearing his gospel at church. If music stirs you instinctually or cerebrally or both, it’s done its job.

The opening track and first single, “Burn the Witch” is the most conventionally structured song in the album. Buoyed by a fast, frightening string section straight out of an arty horror film, it’s a tense and urgent tune that gives way to a far more oblong musical journey afterwards.

“Daydreaming” follows—a languid, sleepy meditation that lead singer Thom Yorke has essentially been writing since OK Computer in 1997. It’s a summation of all the fears, dreads, and wonders the band persistently chases throughout their discography, providing new insights each time with each new phase they enter.

“Decks Dark” perhaps best encapsulates the album’s musical identity: an anomalous hybrid of harrowing archaic choir, weaving strings, Yorke’s croon, and ebullient keyboards. Even if the voice and lyrics aren’t articulate, the emotion is there—it’s all in the sound.

Another track, “The Numbers”, is a heightened version of this combination, propelling the sensation of strings and conventional rock instrumentations into new levels of hysteria and transcendence.

Elsewhere, there are more familiar sounds that Radiohead fans will recognize: “Ful Stop” seeps in quietly, building on a searing guitar loop that crescendos periodically through the cacophony of Yorke’s falsetto wails and shimmering noises.

“Present Tense” is a rollicking, acoustic guitar-driven track that is reminiscent of the band’s prolific first decade of the new millennium. It is no less riveting for being familiar: a plaintive, yearning ode that hooks you throughout its tense course.

Lastly, the album closes with a tune that has batted around the Radiohead canon for two decades now, as a fan favorite at concerts—only officially appearing on the band’s Live EP I Might Be Wrong: Live Recordingsin 2001. Now, “True Love Waits” is punctuated with muted piano chords and lilting keyboard effects. For a fan of the poignant, acoustic guitar-centered live version, it was initially unnerving. But in the context of this searing album, it is fitting. The somber, sedate take feels earned: wary yet hopeful, shattered but enthralled by the wonders of feeling, it’s a serene close to an otherworldly journey.